Cafe Name Ideas

cafe name ideas

    ideas

  • A concept or mental impression
  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; “he had in mind to see his old teacher”; “the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces”
  • (idea) a personal view; “he has an idea that we don’t like him”
  • An opinion or belief
  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action
  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; “it was not a good idea”; “the thought never entered my mind”

    cafe

  • a small restaurant where drinks and snacks are sold
  • The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) are regulations in the United States, first enacted by US Congress in 1975, and intended to improve the average fuel economy of cars and light trucks (trucks, vans and sport utility vehicles) sold in the US in the wake of the 1973 Arab Oil Embargo.
  • Corporate Average Fuel Economy
  • A cafe (or), also spelled cafe, may in the United States mean an informal restaurant, offering a range of hot meals and made-to-order sandwiches, , while in most other countries it refers to an establishment which focuses on serving coffee, like an American coffeehouse.

cafe name ideas – We Beat

We Beat the Street: How a Friendship Led to Success
We Beat the Street: How a Friendship Led to Success
Sampson, George, and Rameck could easily have followed their childhood friends into drugdealing, gangs, and prison. Like their peers, they came from poor, single-parent homes in urban neighborhoods where survival, not scholastic success, was the priority. When the three boys met in a magnet high school in Newark, they recognized each other as kindred spirits who wanted to overcome the incredible odds against them and reach for opportunity. They made a friendship pact, deciding together to take on the biggest challenge of their lives: attending college and then medical school. Along the way they made mistakes and faced disappointments, but by working hard, finding the right mentors, separating themselves from negative influences, and supporting each other, they achieved their goals—and more.
In We Beat the Street, award-winning YA author and teacher Sharon Draper brings the doctors’ childhood, teenage, and young-adult anecdotes vividly to life. Brief “conversations” with the doctors at the end of each chapter provide context and advice in a friendly, nonintrusive way. Youngsters will be captivated by the men’s honest accounts of the street life that threatened to swallow them up, and how they helped each other succeed beyond their wildest expectations.

Marco's Cafe, Barry Island, Wales

Marco's Cafe, Barry Island, Wales
From Wikipedia;

Barry Island (Welsh: Ynys y Barri) is a district, peninsula and seaside resort, forming part of the town of Barry in the Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales. It is named after the 6th century Saint Baruc. Barry’s stretch of coast, on the Bristol Channel, has the world’s second highest tidal range of 15 metres (49 ft),[1] second only to Bay of Fundy in Eastern Canada.

The peninsula was an island until the 1880s when it was linked to the mainland as the town of Barry expanded. This was partly due to the opening of Barry Dock by the Barry Railway Company. Established by David Davies, the docks now link up the gap which used to form Barry Island.

Although Barry Island used to be home to a Butlins Holiday Camp, it is now known more for its beach and Barry Island Pleasure Park.

The area’s railway station serves as one of the termini on the Vale of Glamorgan Line and connects to Cardiff, about 9 miles (14 km) north north east of Barry, in 33 minutes.

Prehistoric Origins

The area around Barry Island shows extensive evidence of modern human occupation. Mesolithic or Middle Stone Age microlith flint tools have been found at Friars Point on Barry Island and near Wenvoe, and Neolithic or New Stone Age polished stone axe-heads were discovered in St. Andrews Major. As the area was heavily wooded and movement would have been restricted, it is likely that people also came to what was to become Wales by boat, apparently from the Iberian Peninsula. They cleared the forests to establish pasture and to cultivate the land. These neolithic colonists, who integrated with the indigenous people, gradually changed from being hunter-gatherers to settled farmers. They built the long barrows at St Lythans and Tinkinswood, which date to around 6,000 BP, only 3 miles (4.8 km) and 4 miles (6.4 km) to the north of Barry Island, respectively.

New cultures

In common with the people living all over Great Britain, over the following centuries the local population assimilated immigrants and exchanged ideas of the Bronze Age and Iron Age Celtic cultures. Together with much of South Wales, Barry Island was settled by a Celtic British tribe called the Silures. There have been five Bronze Age burial mounds, or cairns, recorded on Friars Point.

Although the Roman occupation left no physical impression on Barry Island, there were Romano-British settlements nearby in Barry and Llandough. These people embraced the Roman religion of Christianity and dedicated a chapel to St Baruc, a disciple of St Cadoc. Having forgotten to bring St Cadoc’s reading matter with him, on a journey from the island of Flat Holm, St Baruc was sent back and he drowned in the Bristol Channel on the return journey. He was buried on Barry Island and the ruins of the chapel that was dedicated to him can still be seen in Friars Road. His feast day is on 27 September.

The Vikings launched raids in the area and Barry Island was known to be a raider base in 1087.

The Norman/Welsh chronicler Gerallt Gymro (c.1146 – c.1223) described the origin of his family name in his ‘The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales’ (also known as ‘The Journey through Wales’). Gerallt Gymro, also known as French: Gerald de Barri, Latin: Giraldus Cambrensis and English: Gerald of Wales, wrote "Not far from Caerdyf (sic) is a small island situated near the shore of the Severn, called Barri, from St. Baroc, who formerly lived there, and whose remains are deposited in a chapel overgrown with ivy, having been transferred to a coffin. From hence a noble family, of the maritime parts of South Wales, who owned this island and the adjoining estates, received the name of de Barri." Going on to describe the island’s well, he wrote: "It is remarkable that, in a rock near the entrance of the island, there is a small cavity, to which, if the ear is applied, a noise is heard like that of smiths at work, the blowing of bellows, strokes of hammers, grinding of tools, and roaring of furnaces ; and it might easily be imagined that such noises, which are continued at the ebb and flow of the tides, were occasioned by the influx of the sea under the cavities of the rocks." The 1908 Everyman edition contains a brief description of Barry Island by the Benedictine monk Hugh Paulinus de Cressy (c.1605-1674): "Barri Island is situated on the coast of Glamorganshire; and, according to Cressy, took its name from St. Baruc, the hermit, who resided, and was buried there. The Barrys in Ireland, as well as the family of Giraldus, who were lords of it, are said to have derived their names from this island. John Leland, in speaking of this island, says, ‘The passage into Barrey isle at ful se is a flite shot over, as much as the Tamise is above the bridge. At low water, there is a broken causey to go over, or els over the shalow streamelet of Barrey-brook on the sands. The isle is about a mile in cumpace, and hath very good corne, grasse, and sum wood; the ferme of it worth aio

Immendorff, Jorg (1945-2007) – 1978 Cafe Deutschland II (Bonn Museum of Art, Germany)

Immendorff, Jorg (1945-2007) - 1978 Cafe Deutschland II (Bonn Museum of Art, Germany)
Oil on canvas; 290 x 290 cm.

Jorg Immendorff was one of the best known contemporary German painters; he was also a sculptor, stage designer and art professor. He studied at the Kunstakademie Dusseldorf under Joseph Beuys. The academy expelled him because of some of his left-wing political activities and neo-dadaist actions. From 1969 to 1980 he worked as an art teacher at a public school, and then as a free artist, holding visiting professorships all over Europe. In 1989 he became professor at the Stadelschule in Frankfurt am Main and in 1996 he became professor at the Art Academy in Dusseldorf — the same school that had dismissed him as a student.

His paintings are sometimes reminiscent of surrealism and often use irony and heavy symbolism to convey political ideas. He named one of his first acclaimed works "Hort auf zu malen!" ("Stop painting!"). He was a member of the German art movement Neue Wilde. Best known is his Cafe Deutschland series of sixteen large paintings (1977-1984) that were inspired by Renato Guttuso’s Caffe Greco; in these crowded colorful pictures, Immendorff had disco-goers symbolize the conflict between East and West Germany. Since the 1970s, he worked closely with the painter A. R. Penck from Dresden in East Germany. He created several stage designs, including two for the Salzburg Festival. In 1984 he opened the bar La Paloma in Hamburg St. Pauli and created a large bronze sculpture of Hans Albers there. He also contributed to the design of Andre Heller’s avant-garde amusement park "Luna, Luna" in 1987. Immendorff created various sculptures; one spectacular example is a 25 m tall iron sculpture in the form of an oak tree trunk, erected in Riesa in 1999.

In 1997 he won the best endowed art prize in the world, the MARCO prize of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Monterrey, Mexico. In the following year he received the merit medal (Bundesverdienstkreuz) of the Federal Republic of Germany. He was a friend and the favorite painter of former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroder, who chose Immendorff to paint the official portrait of Schroder for the Bundeskanzlerleramt. The portrait, which was completed by Immendorff’s assistants, was revealed to the public in January 2007; the massive work has ironic character, showing the former Chancellor in stern heroic pose, in the colors of the German flag, painted in the style of an icon, surrounded by little monkeys. These "painter monkeys" were a recurring theme in Immendorff’s work, serving as an ironic commentary on the artist’s business.

Immendorff was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease in 1998. When he could not paint with his left hand any more, he switched to the right. As of 2006, he used a wheelchair full-time and did not paint anymore; instead he directed his assistants to paint following his instructions. On May 27, 2007, at age 61, he succumbed to the disease.